Tiny Tidbits on Babies and Sleep
Tiny Tidbits on Babies and Sleep
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Tiny Tidbits on Babies and Sleep

Tiny Tidbits on Babies and Sleep

We all know that taking care of a baby is no walk in the park; there’s a lot of work, not to mention patience, involved. The only real respite parents have is when they finally get their baby is sleeping (which is its own battle). Here’s a few tidbits about babies and sleep that can hopefully help parents get more sleep themselves.

  1. Babies sleep more, but have shorter sleep cycles than we do. While an adult can tradition from light sleep to deep sleep and back in about 90 min, it takes less than an hour for a baby to do so, and they’re also more sensitive to stimuli that can wake them, such as hunger or noise. Maybe try swaddling to get your baby to sleep in longer intervals.
  2. Your baby wakes up often for a reason. At this stage in their life, their needs are the highest while their ability to communicate is the lowest. If they slept through the night like you and I, that would risk their survival, as they need to be carefully fed, kept warm, and taken care of at all times.
  3. The hardest part is getting over the 3 month hump. After about ninety days, a baby will begin to stay up longer during the day, and for longer periods overnight, which means more uninterrupted sleep for the parents.
  4. Still, after your baby matures in their sleep pattern, there will soon be other things waking him or her up. When babies being to learn to walk or crawl, they may wake up in the middle of night to “practice” their new skill, or when they’re teething they can be restless and wake up crying.
  5. Dr. Ferber actually never told parents to let their baby “cry it out”. The doctor who’s known for the popular Ferber Method of letting your child cry them self to sleep, actually recommends a gradual extinction approach, where you delay your response time to your baby’s waking.

 

Got any tips, tricks, or lifehacks to share that you’ve used to get your baby (and in turn yourself) to sleep soundly? Share them in the comments.