Tidbits About Sleep Around the World
Tidbits About Sleep Around the World
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5 Tidbits About Sleep Around the World

5 Tidbits About Sleep Around the World

Sleep itself isn’t a cultural thing; every person on earth needs it. Yet, like anything else, there are practices and behaviors related to sleep that are ingrained in our cultures. Americans are known for being sleep-deprived, but what about other countries? Here are five interesting things about sleep around the world:

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Spain goes to sleep later than everyone else

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The average Spaniard go to bed at 12:15am on a weekday, and nearly 1am on the weekends. This can be directly attributed to the siesta culture, where many Spanish often take a daily three hour break from 1-4pm to grab lunch, take a nap, and just relax. This means that people work late and don’t even sit down for dinner until around 10pm.

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Mexico keeps the bedroom tidy

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More than any other country, Mexico has the highest rate of people making their bed, with 82% making their bed every day or every other day. Also, one-fourth of Mexicans change their sheets two times a week or more. It’s safe to say they keep their bedrooms in tip-top condition.

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The United Kingdom doesn’t mind sleeping naked

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While a good majority of people sleep in pajamas, others want to feel more liberated; a lot of those people happen to be in the UK, where nearly ⅓ of people sleep naked. If sleeping naked is normal to you, maybe you’re meant to be across the pond.

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Japan really needs to get some rest

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While many associate the U.S. as being a sleep-deprived country, and it is, Japan is more so. On average, the Japanese get less than 6.5 hours of sleep a night during the workweek, with Americans getting about ten minutes more per night. As a result, there is inemuri, which translates to sleeping while on duty. Depending on the profession or employer, taking a nap is either frowned upon, or encouraged to increase productivity.

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North America does not knock their socks off

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Compared to other countries, the United States and Canada are more likely to sleep    with socks on, with 16% and 20% saying they keep them on, respectively. These numbers are much higher than countries on the other end of the spectrum, like Japan (5%) and the UK (7%).

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These stats came from the 2013 international bedroom poll, where the National Sleep Foundation surveyed people ages 25-55 from six major countries (U.S., Mexico, Germany, Japan, U.K., and Canada). Which ones surprised you, and which of these ring true when it comes to your sleep habits?

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